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Local Authority Youth Service in Wales Audit 2003-04

Author: Wales Youth Agency 2005

A data collection and analysis process was included as a target in the Operational Plan of the Wales Youth Agency on the understanding that it would only be funded by WAG if the Principal Youth Officers group supported this process and fully participated. The PYO group acknowledged the importance of youth service data on an all-Wales basis resulting in a 100% return rate. 

This document summarises the key findings from the information supplied by the local authorities under the following headings:

1. Youth Service details – location within LA / job titles / salary scales

2. Finance – income and spending 

3. Youth population – spending per head

4. Staffing levels

5. Types of youth provision

6. Staff development and training

7. Summary / conclusion

EE Revisited Paper 1: Setting the Scene

Author: John Rose 2017

Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.  These are being published in 2017 as there are issues which need to be considered due to the reinvigorated political interest in Extending Entitlement. These papers are intended to be a reminder that the translation of Extending Entitlement policy into practice was not a positive experience for the Youth Service in Wales and that there are inherent dangers that a refreshed Extending Entitlement will have just as many negative connotations unless we learn from, and respond to, the lessons from the past. The papers are: 

Extending Entitlement Revisited:

  • Paper 1: Setting the scene
  • Paper 2: How was the evidence found and analysed?
  • Paper 3: The needs of young people and the Maintained Youth Service response
  • Paper 4: What did politicians want from the Maintained Youth Service?
  • Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those working in the Maintained Youth Service of its discrete identity during the time of the Extending Entitlement launch?
  • Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the tools to meet the priorities of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 7: What was happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 8:  What did the Maintained Youth Service do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?
  • Paper 9:  Findings and recommendations

Paper 1 

The study was carried out at a time when the maintained Youth Service in Wales had become drawn into a political agenda created by the election of New Labour in 1997 and the subsequent setting up of the National Assembly for Wales in 1999. As a consequence of the particular circumstances caused by these two events there was an imperative for the maintained Youth Service to make a rapid transition from its historically marginalised position to one more central within the new young-people agenda. This investigation was concerned to determine if the maintained Youth Service was prepared and able to attain a new and strengthened position that made it secure in the long-term by adopting a strategic approach that promoted its 'young people first' approach and maximised the opportunities presented to it by increased political attention and potential new resources. 

The focus of the investigation, which relied on data collected and analysed between early 2002 and 2007, was to establish if the maintained Youth Service in Wales was concurrently able to meet the needs of young people and the requirements of relevant Government Policy while maintaining its discrete identity as described within its purposes[1] and values[2] statements.

[1] To provide equality of opportunity for all young people in order that they may fulfil their potential as empowered individuals and as members of groups and communities - To support young people in the transition to adulthood - To assist young people to develop attitudes and skills which enable them to make purposeful use of their personal resources and time

[2] Which recognize: social education as the core process in youth and community work; the ability and inability of people to resolve problems and change themselves; the tension and distinction between empowering and controlling people; the rights to self determination; the importance of collective action and collaborative working relationships; and the value of co-operation and conflict

 

Local Authority Involvement in Young People’s Partnerships (YPPs)

Author:
Wales Youth Agency 2002

Standards for the Maintained Youth Service in Wales (draft)

Author: Wales Youth Agency 2005

This draft document was produced by the Principal Youth Officers of Wales (PYOG) with the support of the Wales Youth Agency (WYA) to encourage Local Authority Youth Services to introduce these standards in the context of their total resource allocation.

The document identifies an agreed set of standards for Youth Service provision, which are designed to promote young people’s social development and personal achievement within the economic and social policy agenda of the Welsh Assembly Government. It should complement other standards to secure effective policy for young people across various services. In particular they underpin those of ESTYN in respect of the quality and outcomes of the work of the Youth Service.  Locally agreed standards may improve on these minimum national standards.

[The document remains draft as it was not formally adopted at it's publication due to the financial implications for local authorities in meeting these standards.] 

 

 

Youth Work in Schools: An investigation of youth work, as a process of informal learning, in formal settings.

Author: Dr. Tony Morgan, Pat Morgan, Brian O’Kelly, University of Ulster, for Department of Education (Northern Ireland) 2015

This research project from Northern Ireland investigates the thinking behind youth work in schools from a youth work perspective and a school perspective. It discusses theoretical concepts so that youth work can be understood in a formal context. Youth workers, teachers in relevant schools and young people exposed to this intervention were interviewed. The findings were analysed and discussed and the project concludes with a set of recommendations. 

AGENDA: a young people’s guide to making relationships matter

Author:

PYOG: The role of Youth Work in youth crime prevention and support in Wales

Author: Principal Youth Officers' Group (PYOG) 2016

The role of Youth Work in youth crime prevention and support in Wales

Author: Grwp Prif Swyddogion Ieuenctid 2016

UNISON / Cardiff Metropolitan University Conference 2016 Report

Author: UNISON / Cardiff Metropolitan University 2016

Report of a conference in November 2016 organised by UNISON and Cardiff Metropolitan University on the future of youth work in Wales. Themes covered:

  • Challenges for Young People in Wales Today in the Context of Public Services Cuts 
  • The Future of Youth Work as a Practice 
  • The Future of Youth Work as a Profession 
  • Breakout sessions: Messages for Welsh Government and Trade Unions 

EE Revisited Paper 9: Findings and Recommendations

Author: John Rose 2017
Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.  These are being published in 2017 as there are issues which need to be considered due to the reinvigorated political interest in Extending Entitlement. These papers are intended to be a reminder that the translation of Extending Entitlement policy into practice was not a positive experience for the Youth Service in Wales and that there are inherent dangers that a refreshed Extending Entitlement will have just as many negative connotations unless we learn from, and respond to, the lessons from the past. The papers are:

Extending Entitlement Revisited:

  • Paper 1: Setting the scene

  • Paper 2: How was the evidence found and analysed?

  • Paper 3: The needs of young people and the Maintained Youth Service response

  • Paper 4: What did politicians want from the Maintained Youth Service?

  • Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those working in the Maintained Youth Service of its discrete identity during the time of the Extending Entitlement launch?

  • Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the tools to meet the priorities of Extending Entitlement?

  • Paper 7: What was happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?

  • Paper 8:  What did the Maintained Youth Service do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?

  • Paper 9:  Findings and recommendations