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The role of Youth Work in youth crime prevention and support in Wales

Author: Grwp Prif Swyddogion Ieuenctid 2016

UNISON / Cardiff Metropolitan University Conference 2016 Report

Author: UNISON / Cardiff Metropolitan University 2016

Report of a conference in November 2016 organised by UNISON and Cardiff Metropolitan University on the future of youth work in Wales. Themes covered:

  • Challenges for Young People in Wales Today in the Context of Public Services Cuts 
  • The Future of Youth Work as a Practice 
  • The Future of Youth Work as a Profession 
  • Breakout sessions: Messages for Welsh Government and Trade Unions 

EE Revisited Paper 9: Findings and Recommendations

Author: John Rose 2017
Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.  These are being published in 2017 as there are issues which need to be considered due to the reinvigorated political interest in Extending Entitlement. These papers are intended to be a reminder that the translation of Extending Entitlement policy into practice was not a positive experience for the Youth Service in Wales and that there are inherent dangers that a refreshed Extending Entitlement will have just as many negative connotations unless we learn from, and respond to, the lessons from the past. The papers are:

Extending Entitlement Revisited:

  • Paper 1: Setting the scene

  • Paper 2: How was the evidence found and analysed?

  • Paper 3: The needs of young people and the Maintained Youth Service response

  • Paper 4: What did politicians want from the Maintained Youth Service?

  • Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those working in the Maintained Youth Service of its discrete identity during the time of the Extending Entitlement launch?

  • Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the tools to meet the priorities of Extending Entitlement?

  • Paper 7: What was happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?

  • Paper 8:  What did the Maintained Youth Service do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?

  • Paper 9:  Findings and recommendations


 

 

EE Revisited Paper 8: What did the maintained Youth Service in Wales do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?

Author: John Rose 2017
Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.

EE Revisited Paper 7: What was Happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?

Author: John Rose 2017

Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.  These are being published in 2017 as there are issues which need to be considered due to the reinvigorated political interest in Extending Entitlement. These papers are intended to be a reminder that the translation of Extending Entitlement policy into practice was not a positive experience for the Youth Service in Wales and that there are inherent dangers that a refreshed Extending Entitlement will have just as many negative connotations unless we learn from, and respond to, the lessons from the past. The papers are: 

Extending Entitlement Revisited:

  • Paper 1: Setting the scene
  • Paper 2: How was the evidence found and analysed?
  • Paper 3: The needs of young people and the Maintained Youth Service response
  • Paper 4: What did politicians want from the Maintained Youth Service?
  • Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those working in the Maintained Youth Service of its discrete identity during the time of the Extending Entitlement launch?
  • Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the tools to meet the priorities of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 7: What was happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 8:  What did the Maintained Youth Service do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?
  • Paper 9:  Findings and recommendations

Paper 7:

This paper sets out to provide an overview of how the maintained Youth Service in Wales was organised during early years of the 2000’s as this was identified by:  

  1. the time full and part-time workers spent in direct contact with young people;
  2. the age, gender and academic attainment of those young people using the maintained Youth Service;
  3. the methods used by workers to identify the needs of the young people with whom they come into contact; and
  4. the identified needs of those young people using the maintained Youth Service.

 

 

EE Revisited Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the Tools to Meet the Priorities of Extending Entitlement?

Author: John Rose 2017

Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.  These are being published in 2017 as there are issues which need to be considered due to the reinvigorated political interest in Extending Entitlement. These papers are intended to be a reminder that the translation of Extending Entitlement policy into practice was not a positive experience for the Youth Service in Wales and that there are inherent dangers that a refreshed Extending Entitlement will have just as many negative connotations unless we learn from, and respond to, the lessons from the past. The papers are: 

Extending Entitlement Revisited:

  • Paper 1: Setting the scene
  • Paper 2: How was the evidence found and analysed?
  • Paper 3: The needs of young people and the Maintained Youth Service response
  • Paper 4: What did politicians want from the Maintained Youth Service?
  • Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those working in the Maintained Youth Service of its discrete identity during the time of the Extending Entitlement launch?
  • Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the tools to meet the priorities of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 7: What was happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 8:  What did the Maintained Youth Service do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?
  • Paper 9:  Findings and recommendations

Paper 6:

This paper sets out, to establish the levels of human, financial and material resources available to the maintained Youth Service to deliver a programme of activities which reflects its purpose, principles and values and enables it to meet the needs of young people and the requirements of relevant government policy. 

EE Revisited Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those Working in the Maintained Youth Service of its Discrete Identity During the Time of the Extending Entitlement Launch?

Author: John Rose 2017

Series of nine papers taken from a research Ph.D. They are focused on data about the maintained Youth Service in Wales, collected and analysed from 2002 to 2007 when the Youth Service was first being directed by the Welsh Government policy ‘Extending Entitlement’.  These are being published in 2017 as there are issues which need to be considered due to the reinvigorated political interest in Extending Entitlement. These papers are intended to be a reminder that the translation of Extending Entitlement policy into practice was not a positive experience for the Youth Service in Wales and that there are inherent dangers that a refreshed Extending Entitlement will have just as many negative connotations unless we learn from, and respond to, the lessons from the past. The papers are: 

Extending Entitlement Revisited:

  • Paper 1: Setting the scene
  • Paper 2: How was the evidence found and analysed?
  • Paper 3: The needs of young people and the Maintained Youth Service response
  • Paper 4: What did politicians want from the Maintained Youth Service?
  • Paper 5: How Knowledgeable were those working in the Maintained Youth Service of its discrete identity during the time of the Extending Entitlement launch?
  • Paper 6: Did the Maintained Youth Service have the tools to meet the priorities of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 7: What was happening in the Maintained Youth Service at the time of Extending Entitlement?
  • Paper 8:  What did the Maintained Youth Service do after Extending Entitlement and how was this measured?
  • Paper 9:  Findings and recommendations

Paper 5:

It is the intention of this paper to provide an answer about the level of collective knowledge and understanding of the purposes and associated principles and values of the maintained Youth Service held by those who work within it. This will be done to enable a decision to be made about whether the maintained Youth Service, as a clearly bounded group (or groups) of people interacting together to achieve a particular goal (or goals), is meeting the needs of young people and the requirements of government policy in a formally structured and co-ordinated way.

 

A sustainable future: youth work’s contribution to Welsh Government’s ‘Wellbeing of Future Generations’ policy and ‘Successful Futures’ review

Author: Jamie Jones-Mead

The Welsh Government Wellbeing of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015  and the recommendations from Donaldson’s Successful Futures review gives youth work in Wales a refreshed opportunity to prove its value and create for itself a sustainable future.

This article explores the contribution youth work can make to these Welsh Government policy agendas.

Jamie Jones-Mead was awarded a bursary from Youthworkwales to complete this article.

Jamie is a professionally qualified youth and community worker.  He has 15 years’ experience as a youth worker and has worked in a number of settings in Wales, the UK and globally. 

These include in statutory youth services, with young disabled people, young offenders, young cancer patients and significant experience in the third sector.  As well as being an experienced practitioner, Jamie has a particular interest in health and wellbeing, having spearheaded and managed ASH Wales' youth tobacco and smoking programmes, and is currently working in a public health setting.

Handbook – Health and Wellbeing

Author: CWVYS, various authors 2012

Between 2009-2011 CWVYS was commissioned by the Welsh Government to facilitate the research and publishing of Youth Work Methodology Handbooks or best practice guides for youth workers in Wales. CWVYS facilitated this work by bringing together voluntary youth organisations and maintained local authority youth services. This document is part of a library of Good Practice Methodology Handbooks for Youth Work in Wales. 

Youth work delivers information, advice, activities and support to young people who are learning about the many aspects of Health and Well-being. Youth workers have generally been in the position of seeking the resources to deliver these effectively through their own research. This handbook contains advice, guidance and suggestions for delivering good quality Health and Well-being youth work in one place. It is not meant to be the definitive answer to this but offers resources on most areas in which youth workers engage with young people. The resources are intended to be useable by all youth workers, paid or unpaid, in any setting and for whatever length of time that setting is operational. 

[CWVYS does not represent that the information contained in the handbook is accurate, comprehensive, verified or complete, and shall accept no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this website or for any reliance placed by any person on the information.] 

Handbook – Fit for Purpose Youth Centres

Author: CWVYS, various authors 2012

Between 2009-2011 CWVYS was commissioned by the Welsh Government to facilitate the research and publishing of Youth Work Methodology Handbooks or best practice guides for youth workers in Wales. CWVYS facilitated this work by bringing together voluntary youth organisations and maintained local authority youth services. This document is part of a library of Good Practice Methodology Handbooks for Youth Work in Wales. 

The purpose of writing this handbook is to highlight the role of the youth centre in the delivery of youth work. The work will look at the origins of youth work and the position that buildings take within that, it will look at key milestones in the history of youth work and will draw together aspects of youth work practice and delivery that contribute to the notion of Fit for Purpose Youth Centres.

We will look at the role that youth centres play in the development of young people. Importantly the handbook will focus on the range of activity that is offered but also how the many functions of youth work come under the umbrella of youth centres. This will not be just about Youth services in a Statutory/Local Authority sense but encompass the voluntary sector, private provision but also highlight the importance of the legal aspects of work, how centres are staffed and impact of that. 

[CWVYS does not represent that the information contained in the handbook is accurate, comprehensive, verified or complete, and shall accept no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this website or for any reliance placed by any person on the information.]